About Our Art

Our art collection has a theme running through it. We call it 'dreams and figures'.

Wendy Kawabata - “Withdrawn from Circulation” 2011

Wendy Kawabata’s ‘Withdrawn from Circulation’ uses pages from academic books as an art medium – and a reminder that life itself is transient, that old problems can inspire new answers.

Wendy Kawabata - “Withdrawn from Circulation” 2011
Lianne Edwards “60c Shag” November 2009
Lianne Edwards - “60c Shag” November 2009

Physical books aren’t the only thing disappearing from modern life. Physical letters and colourful stamps are disappearing too. Lianne Edwards’ Sixty-cent shag, is a beautiful paper composition made from intricately cut “Shag” 60 cent stamps. Each stamp represents an unsent letter, an unexpressed dream, an opportunity that was never taken up. The stamps are now mounted, with pins as if in a collection of butterflies.

Lynsie Austin – “Comics Stripped” 2018

Northland artist Lynsie Austin composed a typesetter’s tray worth of comic books in a light-hearted reflection of our youthful dreams. We meet many clients who are turning their dreams into reality.

Lynsie Austin – “Comics Stripped” July 2018
Will Handley – “So Be It” 2006
Will Handley – “So Be It” 2006

Will Handley’s “So Be It” looks at first glance like a bright composition of numbers taken from a a frame of wooden type. But on closer inspection the viewer may see two or three other hidden figures: faces people. The picture acts as a reminder: numbers are just numbers –people are more important.

We're very much about words, rather than numbers' people, so it's great peace of mind for us to know we can safely entrust our future savings to your capable hands.

Sue Reidy & Geoff Walker

Dick Frizzell - “Hot Buttered 11”

Dick Frizzell’s “Hot Buttered 11” captures a piece of kiwiana. Here the artist simply spells out a winning pikelets recipe. A disappearing treat? In our office the recipe metaphor is a good one for financial planning. Dry ingredients such as risk and return, bonds and shares can, when judiciously combined, produce a wonderful recipe.

Dick Frizzell - “Hot Buttered 11”
Graeme Cornwell “Untitled” – 1988 (screenprint)*
Graeme Cornwell - 1988

Graeme Cornwell is a Nelson based master printer whose lithographs display a whimsical humour. His still life study (1986) is typical piece characterised as it is by a paper creation lit in bright theatrical limelight which leads us to question how temporal such things as money may really be.

John Callaghan - 1987

John’s work focuses on the interplay between textured surfaces and light. His photos often convey the weathering effect wrought by time. Here the bold cuts invested in the steel are challenged by the slow depreciation of rust.

John Callaghan “Untitled” – 1987 (cibochrome photo of rusty steel)
Michael Reed “Island on the Edge I – 1988” (screenprint)
Michael Reed - "Island on the Edge I" 1988

Michael Reed, based in Christchurch works across many media, but his forté is in printmaking. He has long felt the medium has an inherent poster-art political dimension. His two screenprints, Islands on the Edge I and II, reflect our geographic isolation and the precarious way we present ourselves as a nation. Is that a shepherd’s crook reflecting the agricultural backbone of our economy? Or is that a hook to drag lesser players off the stage?

Michael Reed - "Island on the Edge II" 1988

Michael Reed, based in Christchurch works across many media, but his forté is in printmaking. He has long felt the medium has an inherent poster-art political dimension. His two screenprints, Islands on the Edge I and II, reflect our geographic isolation and the precarious way we present ourselves as a nation. Is that a shepherd’s crook reflecting the agricultural backbone of our economy? Or is that a hook to drag lesser players off the stage?

Michael Reed “Island on the Edge II – 1988” (screenprint)